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Auto Transport in Nashville, TN.

Along the Cumberland River

SMB Auto Transport for Nashville, Tennessee
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A little about Nashville:

At SMB Auto Transport, we provide you the best auto shipping quotes in the city of Nashville, TN to relocate your car, truck, motorcycle, boat or ATV anywhere in the U.S. or around the world. Part of the process includes providing you a free instant estimate up front with up to 10 no obligation quotes to meet your auto transport needs. The city of Nashville is a common destination for many individuals. Whether you are moving, you have a student attending school or working in Nashville and living somewhere else, you will love the history and culture of Nashville. Regardless of what brought you to this page, we hope you’ll find it an interesting read.

The Basic Facts on Nashville

Nashville is the capital of the state of Tennessee and the county seat of Davidson County. It is located on the Cumberland River in the north-central part of the state. The city is a center for the music, health care, publishing, banking and transportation industries, and is home to several colleges and universities. Reflecting the city's position in state government, Nashville is home to the Tennessee Supreme Court's courthouse for Middle Tennessee. It is known as a center of the music industry, earning it the nickname "Music City".

Nashville has a consolidated city–county government which includes six smaller municipalities in a two-tier system. As of the 2010 census the population of Nashville, not including the semi-independent municipalities, stood at 601,222. The population of Nashville as a whole, including all municipalities, was 626,681. Nashville is the second largest city in Tennessee, after Memphis, and the fourth largest city in the Southeastern United States. The 2010 population of the entire 13-county Nashville metropolitan area was 1,589,934, making it the largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in the state. The 2010 population of the Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Columbia combined statistical area, a larger trade area, was 1,670,890.

Brief History

The town of Nashville was founded by James Robertson, John Donelson, and a party of Overmountain Men in 1779, near the original Cumberland settlement of Fort Nashborough. It was named for Francis Nash, the American Revolutionary War hero. Nashville quickly grew because of its strategic location, accessibility as a river port, and its later status as a major railroad center. In 1806, Nashville was incorporated as a city and became the county seat of Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1843, the city was named the permanent capital of the state of Tennessee.

By 1860, when the first rumblings of secession began to be heard across the South, antebellum Nashville was a very prosperous city. Nashville’s geographical location made it a significant shipping port. This made the city a desirable prize as a means of controlling important river and railroad transportation routes. In February 1862, Nashville became the first state capital to fall to Union troops. The Battle of Nashville (December 15–16, 1864) was a significant Union victory and perhaps the most decisive tactical victory gained by either side in the war.

Within a few years after the Civil War, the city had reclaimed its important shipping and trading position and had also developed a solid manufacturing base. The post–Civil War years of the late 19th century brought a newfound prosperity to Nashville. These healthy economic times left the city with a legacy of grand classical-style buildings, which can still be seen around the downtown area.

In 1963, Nashville consolidated its government with Davidson County, forming a metropolitan government. Since the 1970s, the city has experienced tremendous growth, particularly during the economic boom of the 1990s under the leadership of then Mayor (and later Tennessee Governor), Phil Bredesen, who made urban renewal a priority. Mayor Bredesen fostered the construction or renovation of several city landmarks, including the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the downtown Nashville Public Library, the Bridgestone Arena, and LP Field.

LP Field (formerly Adelphia Coliseum) was built after the National Football League's (NFL) Houston Oilers agreed to move to the city in 1995. The NFL team debuted in Nashville in 1998 at Vanderbilt Stadium, and LP Field opened in the summer of 1999. The Oilers changed their name to the Tennessee Titans and saw a season culminate in the Music City Miracle and a close Super Bowl game that came down to the last play.

In 1997 Nashville was awarded an NHL expansion team which was subsequently named the Nashville Predators.

Today, the city along the Cumberland River is a crossroads of American culture, and one of the fastest-growing areas of the Upland South.

No discussion of Nashville would be complete without mentioning it as the Capital of Country Music and home to the Grand Ole Opry. Nashville is also one of the music recording capitals of the world. The city is world famous for its abundance of outstanding musicians in general and guitarists in particular.

Climate

Nashville has a humid subtropical climate with generally cool to moderately cold winters, and hot, humid summers. Monthly averages range from 37.7 °F in January to 79.4 °F in July. In the winter months, snowfall does occur in Nashville but is usually not heavy. Average annual snowfall is about 5.8 inches, falling mostly in January and February and occasionally March and December. Rainfall is typically greater in winter and spring while autumn is the driest. Spring and fall are generally warm but prone to severe thunderstorms.

Downtown Nashville

The downtown area of Nashville features a diverse assortment of entertainment, dining, cultural and architectural attractions. The Broadway and 2nd Avenue areas feature entertainment venues, night clubs and an assortment of restaurants. North of Broadway lies Nashville's central business district, Legislative Plaza, Capitol Hill and the Tennessee Bicentennial Mall. Cultural and architectural attractions can be found throughout the city.

The downtown area of Nashville is easily accessible. Three major interstate highways, (I-40, I-65 and I-24) converge near the core area of downtown. This juncture is a well-known route for auto transport carriers, since these highways travel and connect many of the southern and Midwest states of the U.S.

Nashville's first skyscraper, the Life & Casualty Tower, was completed in 1957 and started the construction of high rises in downtown Nashville. After the construction of the AT&T Building (commonly known to locals as the "Batman Building") in 1994, the downtown area saw little construction until the mid-2000s. Many new residential developments have been constructed or are planned for the various neighborhoods of downtown and midtown. A new high rise office building, The Pinnacle, was opened in 2010.

Many civic and infrastructure projects are either being planned, in progress, or are recently completed. A new MTA bus hub was built in downtown Nashville, as was the Music City Star pilot project. Several public parks have been constructed, such as the Public Square. Riverfront Park is scheduled to be extensively updated. The Music City Center, a convention center project, is a 1,200,000 square foot (110,000 m2) convention center with 370,000 square feet of exhibit space. It opened in May 2013.

Economy and Culture

Nashville has a vibrant music and entertainment scene spanning a variety of genres. The Tennessee Performing Arts Center is the major performing arts center of the city. It is the home of the Tennessee Repertory Theatre, the Nashville Opera, the Music City Drum and Bugle Corps, and the Nashville Ballet. In September 2006, the Schermerhorn Symphony Center opened as the home of the Nashville Symphony.

Drum and Bugle Corps, and the Nashville Ballet. In September 2006, the Schermerhorn Symphony Center opened as the home of the Nashville Symphony.

As the city's name itself is a metonym for the country music industry, many popular tourist sites involve country music, including the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, Belcourt Theatre, and Ryman Auditorium. The Ryman Auditorium was home to the Grand Ole Opry until 1974 when the show moved to the Grand Ole Opry House, 9 miles east of downtown. The Opry plays there several times a week, except for an annual winter run at the Ryman.

Numerous music clubs and honky-tonk bars can be found in downtown Nashville, especially the area encompassing Lower Broadway, Second Avenue, and Printer's Alley, which is often referred to as "the District". Each year, the CMA Music Festival (formerly known as Fan Fair) brings thousands of country fans to the city. The Tennessee State Fair is also held annually in September.

Although Nashville is renowned as a music recording center and tourist destination, its largest industry is actually health care. Nashville is home to more than 300 health care companies, including Hospital Corporation of America, the largest private operator of hospitals in the world. As of 2012, it is estimated that the health care industry contributes US$30 billion per year and 200,000 jobs to the Nashville-area economy. The automotive industry is also becoming increasingly important for the entire Middle Tennessee region. Nissan North America moved its corporate headquarters in 2006 from Gardena, California (Los Angeles County) to Franklin, southwest of Nashville. Nissan also has its largest North American manufacturing plant in Smyrna, Tennessee. Largely as a result of the increased development of Nissan and other Japanese economic interests in the region, Japan moved its New Orleans consulate-general to Nashville's Palmer Plaza. With this impressive economic growth, it stands to reason that the families and individuals are moving to Nashville daily and utilize auto transport companies to assist.

Other major industries in Nashville include insurance, finance, and publishing (especially religious publishing). The city hosts headquarters operations for several Protestant denominations, including the United Methodist Church, Southern Baptist Convention, National Baptist Convention USA, and the National Association of Free Will Baptists.

Nashville is also known for some of their famously popular Southern confections, including MoonPies and Goo Goo Clusters (which have been made in Nashville since 1912). Fortune 500 companies with offices within Nashville include Dell, HCA and Dollar General. In 2013, the city ranked No. 5 on Forbes' list of the Best Places for Business and Careers.

Education in Nashville

Nashville is home to Vanderbilt University, one of the most prestigious and well know universities in the nation. Nashville is home to many other colleges, universities, professional and art schools. Nashville is home to Tennessee State University, six community colleges and eleven vocational schools.

Auto Transport

If you are considering a move to or from Nashville, you’ll more than likely need to ship one or more of your autos. We’ll provide you with a "No Contact Information Required" estimate. When you are ready to ship, we will provide you with up to ten free quotes from ten different auto shipping companies. In fact, you can fill out one convenient form right here on our website and we’ll get you the quotes you need when you decide to ship your car, truck, motorcycle, ATV or even your RV. SMB Auto Transport is here to make your transition a little smoother.

Nashville, TN

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